Epping Well and Pump and the American Water Works Association encourages ‘getting to know and love’ tap water during Drinking Water Week

Epping Well and Pump, the American Water Works Association and water professionals across North America are kicking off Drinking Water Week with the theme “Your Water – To Know It Is To Love It”.

Epping Well and Pump, AWWA and the water community will celebrate Drinking Water Week by recognizing the vital role water plays in daily lives. “This year’s Drinking Water Week will motivate water consumers to be actively aware of how they personally connect with water,” said AWWA Chief Executive Officer David LaFrance. “We should all know how to find and fix leaks, care for our home’s pipes and support our utility’s investment in water infrastructure.”

How you can play a part in this year’s Drinking Water Week Celebration:

Get the lead out – Lead presents health concerns for people of all ages, particularly pregnant women, infants and young children. In children, low exposure levels have been linked to learning disabilities, behavioral problems and other issues. Lead is sometimes present in pipes connecting older homes to the water system or in fixtures and home plumbing. A licensed plumber can help to identify lead service lines and other materials such as lead fittings and solder. Households can find out more about their water quality by having it tested by a certified laboratory such as Seacoast Analytical Services in Lee, NH.  More information on lead in water can be found on DrinkTap.org.

Check and fix leaks – Consumers are encouraged to quickly and efficiently fix leaks in and around their homes to prevent water waste. To test for leaks inside, customers should shut off everything connected to water and inspect the home’s flow indicator on the water meter. If the indicator continues to move, even with everything off, there’s a leak somewhere in the home. To check for a leaky toilet, customers can place a few drops of food coloring in the holding tank and wait five minutes without flushing. There’s a leak if coloring appears in the bowl. Also, customers should check all faucets and under the sinks for dripping. To check for leaks outside, customers should inspect the lawn for wet spots or pools of water around spray heads. Brown or muddy spots would also indicate there is a leak in the irrigation system.

Check your pipes – Many things can unnecessarily clog a home’s plumbing system, including “flushable” wipes, fats, oils and grease. Each year, these clogged pipes, back up systems and harm the environment when they aren’t disposed of properly. Specifically, flushable wipes, facial tissue, paper towels and medications should be thrown away in the trash and should not be flushed down the toilet. Also, fats, oil and grease should not be dumped down the drain. Instead, they should also be thrown away in the trash.

“Caring for our pipes should be considered maintenance around the home and not just thought of when something goes wrong with them,” said AWWA Chief Executive Officer David LaFrance. “We have to do our part not to clog up our already precarious water and wastewater systems.”

For more than 35 years, AWWA and its members have celebrated Drinking Water Week, a unique opportunity for both water professionals and the communities they serve to join together in recognizing the vital role water plays in daily lives. Thank-you for doing your part.